Ontario Takes Action Against Privacy Breaches and GDPR After One Year

by | May 31, 2019 | Data privacy, Data Privacy Solutions, Facebook, Privacy Breaches, Privacy News

Facebook privacy issues

Ontario looking into stronger privacy control to further protect citizens. Facebook under scrutiny once again over data privacy issues. Taking a look at GDPR one year later. 

Ontario takes action to protect privacy and personal data

79% of surveyed Ontarians believe data about people and businesses in Ontario need stronger protection. “Our government recognizes that the tremendous economic potential of emerging data technologies needs to be balanced with thoughtful and robust protections for the privacy and personal data of all Ontarians,” said Bill Walker, Minister of Government and Consumer Services. “We believe that Ontarians deserve to know and actively consent to the collection of data, how that data is used, and by whom”.

Three areas of focus include:

  • Promoting public trust and confidence
  • Creating economic benefit
  • Enabling a better, smarter, efficient government

Walker states that the Ontarian government is making sure the prime focus is the protection of personal privacy. He hopes our municipal and federal cohorts will do the same.

Judge orders Facebook to turn over records on data privacy

Facebook has been asked to turn over internal records regarding data privacy and access to user data by a judge in Delaware. This was the result of a lawsuit accusing Facebook’s mismanagement of data breaches. Furthermore, Facebook’s counter argument claiming that the investors had not stated a proper purpose for searching the company’s records, was rejected.

One year on, GDPR helps EU combat data privacy concerns, raises bar worldwide

The world as we know it changed when the GDPR came into action. Companies that were using data seamlessly were forced to invest in data centres and to regulate their data collection processes.

GDPR has introduced many new guidelines into the European consumer-business scene, such as the right to be forgotten, which simply means the company has to completely remove the user from their system altogether.

Every country or region is now trying to implement their own versions suitable for their own citizens. India was the first to come out with a similar law, followed by Brazil, Vietnam, China, Japan, Thailand and South Korea.

This cascading effect from GDPR shows light to a promising future of consumer privacy and regulation against the misuse of data. We look forward to seeing what these laws will do for us!

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