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Location data and your privacy

by | Apr 30, 2020

As technology grows to surround the entirety of our lives, it comes as no surprise that each and every move is tracked and stored by the very apps we trust with our information. With the current COVID-19 pandemic, the consequences of inviting these big techs into our every movement are being revealed. 

At this point, most of the technology-users understand the information they do give to companies, such as their birthdays, access to pictures, or other sensitive information. However, some may be unknowing of the amount of location data that companies collect and how that affects their data privacy. 

Location data volume expected to grow

We have created over 90% of the world’s data since 2017. As wearable technology continues to grow in trend, the amount of data a person creates each day is on a steady incline. 

One study reported that by 2025, the installation of worldwide IoT-enabled devices is expected to hit 75 billion. This astronomical number highlights how intertwined technology is into our lives, but also how welcoming we are to that technology; technology that people may be unaware of the ways their data is collected. 

Marketers, companies and advertisers will increasingly look to using location-based information as its volume grows. A recent study found that more than 84% of marketers use location data for their 

The last few years have seen a boost in big tech companies giving their users more control over how their data is used. One example is in 2019 when Apple introduced pop-ups to remind users when apps are using their location data.

Location data is saved and stored for the benefit of companies to easily direct personalized ads and products to your viewing. Understanding what your devices collect from you, and how to eliminate data sharing on your devices is crucial as we move forward in the technological age. 

Click here to read our past article on location data in the form of wearable devices. 

COVID-19 threatens location privacy

Risking the privacy of thousands of people or saving thousands of lives seems to be the question throughout this pandemic; a question that is running out of time for debate. Companies across the big 100 have stepped up to volunteer its anonymized data, including SAS, Google and Apple. 

One of the largest concerns is not how this data is being used in this pandemic, but how it could be abused in the future. 

One Forbes article brought up a comparison of the regret many are faced with after sharing DNA with sites like 23andMe, leading to health insurance issues or run-ins with criminal activity. 

As companies like Google, Apple and Facebook step-up to the COVID-19 technology race, many are expressing their concerns as these companies have not been deemed reliable for user data anonymization. 

In addition to the data-collecting concern, governments and big tech companies are looking into contact-tracking applications. Civilian location data being used for surveillance purposes, while alluded for the greater good of health and safety, raises multiple red flags into how our phones can be used to survey our every movement. To read more about this involvement in contact tracing apps, read our latest article

Each company has released that it anonymizes its collected data. However, in this pandemic age, anonymized information can still be exploited, especially at the hands of government intervention. 

With all this said, big tech holds power over our information and are playing a vital role in the COVID-19 response. Paying close attention to how user data is managed post-pandemic will be valuable in exposing how these companies handle user information.