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How can working from home affect your data privacy?

by | Mar 27, 2020

On March 11, the World Health Organization declared the Coronavirus (COVID-19) a global pandemic, sending the world into a mass frenzy. Since that declaration, countries around the world have shut borders, closed schools, requested citizens to stay indoors, and sent workers home. 

While the world may appear to be at a standstill, some jobs still need to get done. Like us at CryptoNumerics, companies have sent their workers home with the tools they need to complete their regularly scheduled tasks from the comfort of their own homes. 

However, with a new influx of people working from home, insecure networks, websites or AI tools can lead company information vulnerable. In this article, we’ll go over where your privacy may be at risk during this work-from-home season.

Zoom’s influx of new users raises privacy concerns.

Zoom is a video-conferencing company used to host meetings, online-charts and online collaboration. Since people across the world are required to work or participate in online schooling, Zoom has seen a substantial increase in users. In February, Zoom shares raised 40%, and in 3 months, it has doubled its monthly active users from the entire year of 2019 (Source). 

While this influx and global exposure are significant for any company, this unprecedented level of usage can expose holes in their privacy protection efforts, a concern that many are starting to raise

Zoom’s growing demand makes them a big target for third-parties, such as hackers, looking to gain access to sensitive or personal data. Zoom is being used by companies large and small, as well as students across university campus. This means there is a grand scale of important, sensitive data could very well be vulnerable. 

Some university professors have decided against Zoom telecommuting, saying the Zoom privacy policy, which states that they may collect information about recorded meetings that take place in video conferences, raises too many concerns of personal privacy. 

On a personal privacy level, Zoom gives the administrator of the conference call the ability to see when a caller has moved to another webpage for over 30 seconds. Many are calling this option a violation of employee privacy. 

Internet-rights advocates have begun urging Zoom to begin publishing transparent reports detailing how they manage data privacy and data security.  

Is your Alexa listening to your work conversations?

Both Google Home and Amazon’s Alexa have previously made headlines for listening to homes without being called upon and saving conversation logs.  

Last April, Bloomberg released a report highlighting Amazon workings listening to and transcribing conversations heard through Alexa’s in people’s homes. Bloomberg reported that most voice assistant technologies rely on human help to help improve the product. They reported that not only were the Amazon employees listening to Alexa’s without the Alexa’s being called on by users but also sharing the things they heard with their co-workers. 

Amazon claims the recordings sent to the “Alexa reviewers” are only provided with an account number, not an address or full name to identify a user with. However, the entire notion of hearing full, personal conversations is uncomfortable.

As the world is sent to work from home, and over 100 million Alexa devices are in American homes, there should be some concern over to what degree these speaker systems are listening in to your work conversations.   

Our advice during this work-from-home-long-haul? Review your online application privacy settings, and be cautious of what devices may be listening when you have important meetings or calls.