Rewarded for sharing your data? Sign me up!

Rewarded for sharing your data? Sign me up!

Companies now starting to pay users for their data, in efforts to be more ethical. Large Bluetooth security flaw detected proving potentially harmful to millions. Blockchain’s future looking bright as privacy-preserving technology booms. Canadian federal elections being ‘watched’ for their history of ‘watching’ public.

Rewarded for sharing your data? Sign me up!

Drop Technologies has secured USD$44 million in investments towards growing a technology-based alternative towards traditional customer loyalty programs. With over three million users signed up already, as well as 300 brands on its platform, such as Expedia and Postmates, the company is headed in the right direction. 

Given that Facebook and other tech giants are monetizing data without user permission, getting paid for it doesn’t seem like a bad idea after all. “I’m a Facebook user and an Instagram user, and these guys are just monetizing my data left and right, without much transparency,” said Onsi Sawiris, a managing partner at New York’s HOF Capital.” At least if I’m signing up for Drop, I know that if they’re using my data I will get something in return, and it’s very clear” (Source).

This alternative to rewards programs basically tracks your spending with all of their 300+ brands, and lets you earn points that you can spend at certain companies such as Starbucks of Uber Eats. If it’s an alternative to credit card rewards, it will be beneficial to consumers looking for extra savings on their purchases. So don’t drop it till you try it!

Bluetooth proving to be a potential data breach vulnerability 

Researchers have discovered a flaw that leaves millions of Bluetooth users vulnerable to data breaches. This flaw enables attackers to interfere while two users are trying to connect without being detected, as long as they’re within a certain range. From music to conversations, to data entered through a Bluetooth device, anything could be at risk. “Upon checking more than 14 Bluetooth chips from popular manufacturers such as Qualcomm, Apple, and Intel, researchers discovered that all the tested devices are vulnerable to attacks” (Source). 

Fortunately, some companies such as Apple and Intel have already implemented security upgrades on their devices. Users are also advised to keep their security, software, and firmware updated at all times. 

Get ready for blockchain advancements like never before

For the past decade, blockchain has been used to build an ecosystem where cryptocurrencies and peer-to-peer transactions are just a few of the many use cases. (Source).

Traditionally, data is shared across centralized networks, leaving systems vulnerable to attacks. However, with decentralization as an added security measure to blockchain, the threat of a single point of failure across a distributed network is eradicated. 

As more and more companies turn to blockchain to gain the benefits of more efficient data sharing and easier data transfers, privacy is overlooked.

In most public blockchains today, transactions are visible to all nodes of a network. Naturally, of course, the issue of privacy is raised due to the sensitive nature of the data, and this transparency comes at a cost. With digital transformation happening all around us, privacy protection cannot be ignored.

To address privacy, many blockchain companies are employing privacy-preserving mechanisms on their infrastructures, from zero-knowledge proofs to encryption algorithms such as Multi-Party Computation (MPC). These mechanisms encrypt data as it’s shared and only reveal the specific elements needed for a specific task (Source).

Costs efficiencies and a better understanding of consumer needs are just a few of the advantages of privacy-preserving mechanisms being introduced. As data and privacy go hand in hand in the future, equitability and trust will be our key to unlock new possibilities that enhance life as we know it (Source).

Upcoming Canadian elections could turn into surveillance problem

Once again, the Canadian federal elections are raising concerns about interference and disruption through the misuse of personal data. In the past, political parties have been known to use their power to influence populations who are not aware of how their data is being used. 

Since data has played a major role in elections, this could become a surveillance issue because experts who study surveillance say that harnessing data has been the key to electoral success, in past elections. “Politicians the world over now believe they can win elections if they just have better, more refined and more accurate data on the electorate” (Source).

A related issue is a lack of transparency between voters and electoral candidates. “There is a divide between how little is publicly known about what actually goes on in platform businesses that create online networks, like Facebook or Twitter, and what supporters of proper democratic practices argue should be known” (Source).

The officials of this upcoming election should be paying close attention to the public’s personal data and how it is being used.

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How to Decode a Privacy Policy

How to Decode a Privacy Policy

How to Decode a Privacy Policy

91% of Americans skip privacy policies before downloading apps. It is no secret that people and businesses are taking advantage of that, given that there’s a new app scandal, data breach or hack everyday. For example, take a look at the FaceApp fiasco from last month.

In their terms of use, they clearly state the following;

 “You grant FaceApp a perpetual, irrevocable, nonexclusive, royalty-free, worldwide, fully-paid, transferable sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, publicly perform and display your User Content and any name, username or likeness provided in connection with your User Content in all media formats and channels now known or later developed, without compensation to you. When you post or otherwise share User Content on or through our Services, you understand that your User Content and any associated information (such as your [username], location or profile photo) will be visible to the public” (Source).

However, these documents should actually be rendered important, especially since it discloses legal information about your data, including what the company will do with your data, how they will use it and with whom they will share it. 

So let’s look at the most efficient way to read through these excruciating documents. Search for specific terms by doing a keyword or key phrase search. The following terms are a great starting point: 

  • Third parties
  • Except
  • Retain
  • Opt-out
  • Delete
  • With the exception of
  • Store/storage
  • Rights 
  • Public 

“All consumers must understand the threats, their rights, and what companies are asking you to agree to in return for downloading any app,” Adam Levin, Founder of CyberScout says. “We’re living in an instant-gratification society, where people are more willing to agree to something because they want it right now. But this usually comes at a price” (Source).

New York Passes Data Breach Law

A New York law has recently been passed, known as the SHIELD Act, or the Stop Hacks and Improve Electronic Data Security Act. This act requires businesses that collect personal data from New York residents to comply. Below are some of the act’s enforcement and features: 

  • requires notification to affected consumers when there is a security breach,
  • broadens the scope of covered information, 
  • expands the definition of what a data breach means, 
  • and extends the notification requirement to any entity with the private information of a New York resident (Source)

Why Apple Won’t Let You Delete Siri Recordings

Apple claims to protect its users’ privacy by not letting them delete their specific recordings. “Apple’s Siri recordings are given a random identifier each time the voice assistant is activated. That practice means Apple can’t find your specific voice recordings. It also means voice recordings can’t be traced back to a specific account or device” (Source).

After it was reported that contractors were listening to private Siri conversations, including doctor discussions and intimate encounters, Apple needed to change its privacy policies. 

The reason why Siri works differently than its rivals is because of how Google Assistant or Alexa data is connected directly with a user’s account for personalization and customer service reasons. Apple works differently, as they don’t rely too much on ad revenue and customer personalization like their rivals – they rely on their hardware products and services.

LAPD Data Breach Exposes 2,500 Officers’ Data

The PII of about 17,500 LAPD applicants and 2,500 officers has been stolen in a recent data breach, with information such as names, IDs, addresses, dates of birth and employee IDs compromised.

LAPD and the city are working together to understand the severity and impact of the breach. 

“We are also taking steps to ensure the department’s data is protected from any further intrusions,” the LAPD said. “The employees and individuals who may have been affected by this incident have been notified, and we will continue to update them as we progress through this investigation” (Source).

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CES and Data Privacy

CES and Data Privacy

Facebook privacy issues

James Martin/CNET

Data privacy was present at the Consumer Electronics Show, however, the way in which tech companies are protecting privacy is still unclear.  

This week, more than 180,000 people gathered in Las Vegas for the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) expecting to be impressed by the latest technology products. However, attendees found that data privacy was present among the new technologies and companies.

The first proof of the importance of privacy in this year’s CES came from Apple in the form of a giant billboard on a building in Las Vegas that read “What happens on your iPhone, stays on your iPhone.” Since 2016, Apple has used privacy as a competitive advantage going as far as Tim Cook denouncing that data is being “weaponized against us with military efficiency by the data-industrial complex.” Even though Apple does not have a presence inside the CES, it’s marketing brilliance was made evident with the billboard.

Inside the event, privacy was present in various ways:

  • Steve Koening, Consumer Technology Association Vice President, spoke about the importance of data for today’s technology and how data privacy and security are more relevant than ever.
  • BlackBerry announced “BlackBerry Secure,” a new branding that aims to position the company among consumers and manufacturers as a referent in data security and privacy.
  • LG introduced ThinkQ, an AI platform that gives personalized recommendations based on usage patterns. David Vanderwaall, SVP of marketing for LG Electronic’s US Arm, mentioned that the company is using a hybrid privacy-protection method in which the device stores individual usage data, but only aggregated data is sent to the cloud.
  • Mycroft, a smart assistant that competes with Amazon’s Alexa and Google Assitant, does not collect or store any data from the users as do the other two. It will be interesting to see how intelligent the assistant can be without collecting data.
  • A conference titled “American Privacy Regulations in a Post-GDPR World” featured Walmart’s Director of Global Public Policy, Consumer Technology Association’s SVP of Government and Regulatory Affairs, among others, discussing privacy regulations.

In 2019 we will see data privacy becoming a business imperative, either because organizations have to comply with regulations and/or because consumers are demanding it. However, organizations have the responsibility to move from using data privacy as a marketing/buzzword to educating customers on how personal data is protected. 

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