Facial Recognition Technology is Shaking Up the States

by | Aug 16, 2019

Facial recognition technology is shaking up the States

Many states in America are employing facial recognition devices at borders to screen travelers. However, some cities like Massachusetts and San Francisco have banned the use of these devices, and the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) is pushing for a nationwide ban. 

It is still unclear how the confidential data gathered by the facial recognition devices will be used. Could it be shared with other branches of the government, such as ICE? 

ICE, or Immigrations and Customs Enforcement have been in the public eye for some time now, for their arrests of undocumented workers and immigration offenders. 

“Any time in the last three to four years that any data collection has come up, immigrants’ rights … have certainly been part of the argument,” says Brian Hofer, who is part of Oakland’s Privacy Advisory Commission. “Any data collected is going to be at risk when [ICE is] on a warpath, looking for anything they can do to arrest people. We’re definitely trying to minimize that exposure”.

This unregulated data is what is helping ICE locate and monitor undocumented people violating laws (Source).

Now Microsoft is listening to your Skype calls

A new day, a new privacy scandal. This week, Microsoft and Skype employees were revealed to be reviewing real consumer video chats, to check the quality of their software, and its translations. 

The problem is that they are keeping their customers in the dark on this, as do most tech companies. Microsoft has not told its consumers that they do this, though the company claims to have their users’ permission. 

“I recommend users refrain from revealing any identifying information while using Skype Translation, and Cortana. Unless you identify yourself in the recording, there’s almost no way for a human analyst to figure out who you are”, says privacy advocate Paul Bischoff (Source).

Essentially Alexa, Siri, Google Home, and Skype are listening to your conversations. However, instead of avoiding these products, we are compromising our privacy for convenience and efficiency. 

Canadians want more healthcare tech, regardless of privacy risks

New studies indicate that Canadians are open to a future where healthcare is further enhanced with technology, despite privacy concerns. 

The advantages of these innovations include reduced medical errors, reduced data loss, better-informed patients, and much more. 84% of respondents wanted to access their health data on an electronic platform, as opposed to hard copy files. 

Dr. Gigi Osler, president of the Canadian Medical Association, states, “We’ve got hospitals that still rely on pagers and fax machines, so the message is clear that Canada’s health system needs an upgrade and it’s time to modernize”. 

Furthermore, most respondents look forward to the possibility of online doctor visits, believing that treatment could be faster and more convenient (Source).

After all, if we bank, shop, read, watch movies and socialize online, why can’t we get digital treatment too? 

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