How to Decode a Privacy Policy

by | Aug 2, 2019

How to Decode a Privacy Policy

91% of Americans skip privacy policies before downloading apps. It is no secret that people and businesses are taking advantage of that, given that there’s a new app scandal, data breach, or hack everyday. For example, take a look at the FaceApp fiasco from last month.

In their terms of use, they clearly state the following;

 “You grant FaceApp a perpetual, irrevocable, nonexclusive, royalty-free, worldwide, fully-paid, transferable sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, publicly perform and display your User Content and any name, username or likeness provided in connection with your User Content in all media formats and channels now known or later developed, without compensation to you. When you post or otherwise share User Content on or through our Services, you understand that your User Content and any associated information (such as your [username], location or profile photo) will be visible to the public” (Source).

However, these documents should actually be rendered important, especially since it discloses legal information about your data, including what the company will do with your data, how they will use it and with whom they will share it. 

So let’s look at the most efficient way to read through these excruciating documents. Search for specific terms by doing a keyword or key phrase search. The following terms are a great starting point: 

  • Third parties
  • Except
  • Retain
  • Opt-out
  • Delete
  • With the exception of
  • Store/storage
  • Rights 
  • Public 

“All consumers must understand the threats, their rights, and what companies are asking you to agree to in return for downloading any app,” Adam Levin, Founder of CyberScout says. “We’re living in an instant-gratification society, where people are more willing to agree to something because they want it right now. But this usually comes at a price” (Source).

New York Passes Data Breach Law

A New York law has recently been passed, known as the SHIELD Act, or the Stop Hacks and Improve Electronic Data Security Act. This act requires businesses that collect personal data from New York residents to comply. Below are some of the act’s enforcement and features: 

  • requires notification to affected consumers when there is a security breach,
  • broadens the scope of covered information, 
  • expands the definition of what a data breach means, 
  • and extends the notification requirement to any entity with the private information of a New York resident (Source)

Why Apple Won’t Let You Delete Siri Recordings

Apple claims to protect its users’ privacy by not letting them delete their specific recordings. “Apple’s Siri recordings are given a random identifier each time the voice assistant is activated. That practice means Apple can’t find your specific voice recordings. It also means voice recordings can’t be traced back to a specific account or device” (Source).

After it was reported that contractors were listening to private Siri conversations, including doctor discussions and intimate encounters, Apple needed to change its privacy policies. 

The reason why Siri works differently than its rivals is because of how Google Assistant or Alexa data is connected directly with a user’s account for personalization and customer service reasons. Apple works differently, as they don’t rely too much on ad revenue and customer personalization like their rivals – they rely on their hardware products and services.

LAPD Data Breach Exposes 2,500 Officers’ Data

The PII of about 17,500 LAPD applicants and 2,500 officers has been stolen in a recent data breach, with information such as names, IDs, addresses, dates of birth and employee IDs compromised.

LAPD and the city are working together to understand the severity and impact of the breach. 

“We are also taking steps to ensure the department’s data is protected from any further intrusions,” the LAPD said. “The employees and individuals who may have been affected by this incident have been notified, and we will continue to update them as we progress through this investigation” (Source).

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